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Predictors of Non-Alcoholic Liver Disease in Ethnically Diverse Overweight Children and Adolescents

[ Vol. 14 , Issue. 2 ]

Author(s):

Pamela Botero*, Elizabeth M. Hoy, Maria C. Jimenez, Tulay Koru-Sengul and Sarah E. Messiah   Pages 130 - 135 ( 6 )

Abstract:


Objectives: To study the relationship between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and sleep, Physical Activity (PA), and screen-time habits/behaviors among a multiethnic sample of overweight children/adolescents.

Methods: A retrospective medical chart review (6/2013-7/2014) identified 209 patients (7-21 years old) who were overweight/obese (BMI > 85th% for age/sex). A follow-up telephone survey was completed among 130 of these patients' parents to obtain information on sleep, screen-time, PA habits, and socio-demographics. NAFLD was defined as ALT and/or AST levels above the age/sexadjusted cutoff value in the absence of medications or associated medical conditions. Logistic regression models were fitted to identify predictors of NAFLD by adjusting age, sex, heritage, and income.

Results: Over a third (34%) of the sample (N=130, 55% males, 74% Hispanic) had NAFLD. Compared to non-Hispanics, Central American heritage subjects were over three times as likely to have NAFLD compared to non-Hispanics (OR=3.90, 95% CI, 1.23-12.37) after adjusting for socioeconomics and lifestyle habits. Subjects with low PA levels were at increased risk for NAFLD (aOR=4.52, 95% CI, 1.21-16.82) compared to their more active counterparts. Lower income families were over twice as likely to have NAFLD as higher income families (OR = 2.57, 0.95-6.96).

Conclusions: Families residing from a Central American heritage are at significant risk for NAFLD versus their ethnic group counterparts. Identifying specific groups and risks for pediatric-onset NAFLD can inform and improve clinical practice and public health initiatives, especially as patient populations become more ethnically diverse across the nation.

Keywords:

Overweight, obesity, liver disease, behavior, diverse, adolescents.

Affiliation:

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, Florida, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine



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